Bias Resource Team

The role of the Bias Resource Team is to coordinate the University’s response to bias activity that is likely to affect the University community and to ensure that individuals or groups who are adversely affected by bias activity receive appropriate support and guidance.

The Bias Resource Team supplements, but does not supersede existing University policies and procedures, and it supports the efforts of University offices and departments that address bias activity.

The specific activities of the Bias Resource Team will be tailored to the nature of the bias activity it seeks to address but may include:

  • Ensuring prompt, clear communication among relevant constituencies, units, and the University community as a whole
  • Coordinating support for affected individuals and communities
  • Promoting learning opportunities for the broader University community
  • Recommending policy changes
  • Ensuring that the response to bias activity is appropriate and, to the extent possible, transparent

Core BRT members are listed below, although other individuals may be added as circumstances require.

Steve Bisese, vice president for student development

Joe Boehman, dean of Richmond College

Tina Cade, associate vice president for student development and director of Multicultural Affairs

Jacquelyn Fetrow, provost

Glyn Hughes, director of Common Ground, chair

Juliette Landphair, dean of Westhampton College

Peter LeViness, director of Counseling and Psychological Services

Craig Kocher, University chaplain

David McCoy, associate vice president of Public Safety and chief of police

Shannon Sinclair, University general counsel

Carl Sorensen, associate vice president of Human Resource Services

Lori Schuyler, chief of staff, President’s Office

Lisa Van Riper, assistant vice president for communications

Student Government presidents (Richmond College, School of Continuing Studies, Student Bar Association and Westhampton College)

Bias Resource Team Guiding Principles

The Bias Resource Team’s coordination of the University’s official response to bias-related crises should model and facilitate practices that are consistent with the University’s values related to difference and inclusion. Following are the principles guiding the BRT’s response to individual incidents:

  • The safety of our campus and all of its members and guests is paramount. Safety has both physical and emotional dimensions.
  • Members of marginalized groups targeted by bias incidents should have a prominent voice in determining the institutional response to those incidents.
  • Meaningful, productive dialogue should prevail over impulses for revenge or retribution.
  • Dialogue is productive and meaningful when it leads to self-reflection and positive change.
  • Crises and the institutional resources they demand should not be allowed to derail positive change initiatives already underway.