Richmond Home

Breakout Sessions

Session 1 - 1:40-3 p.m.
Being a Queer Person of Color
Being a Queer Person of Color

Category: Workshop
Facilitators: Joshua Kim, University of Richmond

Description

This session will discuss what it means to be queer and to be a person of color (POC). It will begin with a presentation of cultural norms within the Asian community. Focus will be put on hyper masculinity and religion within said community, and how these factors influence one's ability to come out. A personal testimony will be used in order to show that this issue is not just a fabrication, but rather is reality and that it happens to thousands of LGBTQ+ POC all around the United States. The personal testimony will then open up discussion for attendees of various ethnic backgrounds to share with one another and gain insight on different cultural perspectives.

Empowerment through Movement
Empowerment through Movement

Category: Art Space
Facilitators: Kylie Britt, University of Richmond

Description

Movement of the body is closely tied to emotions, stress, and confidence. Learning to "walk the walk" is often used as a way to describe fitting in and becoming comfortable with a certain concept. This workshop will focus on using dance, acting, and improvisation techniques that encourage comfort in movement. I will use stretching and simple choreography to set a baseline that encourages growth and development of participant's own style and choreography. Participants may use their movement to display feelings they are developing throughout the sessions and will establish movements that represent their identities. Session-goers can expect to walk away with a sense of confidence in their body and expressing their feelings through movement.

Healthy Relationships, Healthy Movements
Healthy Relationships, Healty Movements

Category: Workshop
Facilitators: Ha Tran, Virginia Anti-Violence Project

Description

In the intersections of queer, gender & racial justice, our interpersonal relationships cannot be separated from our liberation struggles. We build together, and we need each other. What are ways that we can define and live our values, practice them one-on-one, and carry that work toward collective liberation? This workshop will facilitate an analysis of how value-setting can help us to navigate an oppressive world, and start a conversation on ways to hold ourselves accountable when we stray from those values. How can we vision and build together simultaneously on a micro and macro level, for long-term sustainability? What does "health" look like for our relationships, organizations, movements, and whole selves? This workshop is a starting and defining space for these complex questions.

 

Defacing the Movement: Leadership and Representation in Queer and Racial Justice CIrcles
Defacing the Movement: Leadership and Representation in Queer and Racial Justice CIrcles

Category: Workshop
Facilitators: Maddy Dunbar & Jazzmin Reid, University of Richmond

Description

In this session we will be discussing how the leadership and public faces of movements often misrepresent those who do most of the work. In a queer community that seems to be lead by cis, white, upper-class men, and racial justice movements that focus on cis, straight, black men, how can the voices of those who do not fit that mold be heard? This session will attempt to highlight the ways in which social justice movements that attempt to give voices to oppressed groups, further silence it’s already marginalized members. We hope to lead a discussion on how to elevate the voices of those who are minorities within minorities.

Session 2 - 3:10-4:30 p.m.
We Gon Be Alright: Cultivating Community Care
We Gon Be Alright: Cultivating Community Care

Category: Workshop
Facilitators: Micky Jordan, SONG & Ha Tran, Virginia Anti-Violence Project

Description

This workshop will be a session on grief and wellness planning in an attempt to help participants understand how to engage in community care. We will go through readings and group activities to share coping mechanisms and strategies with each other. This workshop aims talk about grief in terms of loss, changes in relationships (platonic or romantic), changes in life, dealing with trauma, etc. Participants will learns and share with each other their needs with healing and care. What's holding them back from feeling free? How do they cope with trauma from racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism or a combination of many of these oppression. This workshop does not aim to have all the answers, but give a framework to how we are a community of people can take care of each other in ways that we need. It does aim to give participants permission to speak to what they need and find solutions through collective channels. Understand how to heal from and deal wi! th grief and understand what kind of care you need is vitally important to racial justice. Organizers and activists can suffer from burn out from giving up too much of themselves, and we know that queer and trans people of color are often devalued and not taken seriously for their knowledge and their work. This workshop will name that truth and help all participants understand how systems of oppression affect any sort of healing.

Decolonizing Queer Theory
Decolonizing Queer Theory

Category: Workshop
Facilitators: Camila Grez Messina, Virginia Commonwealth University

Description

"As a mestiza I have no country, my homeland cast me out; yet all countries are mine because I am every woman's sister or potential lover. (As a lesbian I have no race, my own people disclaim me; but I am all races because there is the queer of me in all races.)" - Gloria Anzaldúa, from Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza

To decolonize queer theory is to acknowledge the colonial roots of sexuality, sexual behavior, and gender. This is intended to be an introductory, surface-level analysis of the ways in which queer theory is exclusionary. Queer of Color Critique will be used to help in our analyses.

Shame Resilience
Shame Resilience

Category: Workshop
Facilitators: Jayson Vivas, University of Richmond

Description

The program I want to run is developing the often unconscious skill of building shame resilience. Shame resilience is the ability to recognize when we are experiencing shame, and be able to work through this intense emotion in order to gain a new awareness about ourselves and the world we are living in. This concept is based in the theory developed by Brenè Brown, and its application to social justice is limitless. As youth engaged in social justice, we will face challenges to our self worth from those who seek to maintain the power structures of society, whether consciously or not. If we lose our sense of self worth, or start to diminish the self worth of others we will ultimately limit our ability to create a world where everyone belongs, no matter what race, gender or identity. The session itself will feature a presentation, introducing concepts such as shame, shame resilience, consciousness raising and the ways these affect the way we lead and build our organizations. These terms are based on the latest research on shame, however, it will be in terms everyone can understand in order to increase effectiveness and utility. Part of the presentation will include my own experiences where I have engaged in social justice, including being a part of campus organizations and writing opinion pieces for my school newspaper. I will convey how shame resilience became a central theme in my efforts to speak against injustice. After the presentation there will be a discussion and the audience will break out into small groups. Using the new language I will present for them to speak about their experiences ("speaking shame") they will experience first hand how sharing their stories can create change by exchanging stories of shame among their! peers.